Subcommittee on Information Network and Social Infrastructure

Background and Missions

Internet services have been widely available in Japan, and they have been steadily upgraded to FTTH-based broadband systems. Nowadays information networks serve as an important infrastructure, supporting a variety of social activities.

Recently information networks are expected to provide strong solutions to various important problems in our society (e.g., green innovation, life innovation, safety and security), and even to be an enabler of a social paradigm shift. To this end, we need to address a number of issues; research and development of the next-generation information network infrastructure in both industry and academia, collaboration of industry, academia and government, utilization of knowledge networks through international collaboration, new frameworks to encourage R&D and value creation, improvement of environment including organizational restructuring, and development of human resources. Based on the background discussed above, the Science Council of Japan is expected to find potential issues in the current information network infrastructure, to recommend solutions to these problems, and to advertise the solutions and experience both inside and outside the country. Our mission is to take this important role through our activity.

Scope

Organizing issues in the next-generation networks; recommendation of solutions to the issues; public advertisement to a society; development of human resources; development of knowledge networks

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Shinji Shimojo (Osaka University)
E-mail: shimojo [at] cmc.osaka-u.ac.jp

Committee Members

Hitoshi Aida
The University of Tokyo
Kiyoshi Agusa
Nanzan University
Haruhisa Ichikawa
University of Electro-Communications
Hiroshi Esaki
The University of Tokyo
Yuji Oie
Kyushu Institute of Technology
Manager
Saeko Oshiba
Kyoto Institute of Technology
Noboru Onishi
Nagoya University
Atsuhiro Goto
Institute of Information Security
Koichi Sakaniwa
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Takashi Sawai
Tohoku University
Chair
Shinji Shimojo
Osaka University
Satoshi Sekiguchi
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Masakazu Sengoku
Niigata University
Yukari Tsuji
Nippon Telegraph and Telephone West Corporation
Teruo Higashino
Osaka University
Hideo Miyahara
Osaka University
Masayuki Murata
Osaka University

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Subcommittee on International Science Data

Background and Missions

A key in utilization of scientific and technological data is to share and utilize them as public goods of international society, beyond the boundaries between different regions, countries, academic fields, and industries. Such activity has been lead by CODATA (Committee on Data for Science and Technology), which was established by ICSU in 1966. The Science Council of Japan has joined this organization since its early stage and has taken an important role in its international activity. Originally started with evaluation and organization of fundamental scientific data (e.g., physical constants), the activity has now been expanded to much wider range of fields including climate change, biodiversity, open access, aiming to address global issues. We promote data utilization to establish close relationship between science and society, and make recommendation at the World Summit on the Information Society.

The massive earthquake on 11th of March revealed serious problems on energy, economy, environment, disaster control, and healthcare, triggering global demand for reliable scientific data. This subcommittee discusses issues in providing achievements of the academic activity in the form of data, and make recommendation to lead international activity.

Scope

  • Cooperation and leadership on ICSU-related international data utilization activity
  • Recommendation on interfaces between scientific and technological data and society
  • Scenarios for scientific and technological development with data

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Shuichi Iwata (Graduate School of Project Design)
E-mail: s.iwata [at] mpd.ac.jp

Committee Members

Chair
Shuichi Iwata
Graduate School of Project Design
Kenichi Ueda
University of Electro-Communications
Genshiro Kitagawa
Research Organization of Information and Systems
Takashi Goryobori
Research Organization of Information and Systems
Vice Chair
Toshihiko Koseki
The University of Tokyo
Satoshi Sekiguchi
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Hiroo Hamaguchi
The University of Tokyo
Manager
Shigeko Haruyama
Mie University
Yoichi Muraoka
Waseda University
Yasuhiro Murayama
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology

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Subcommittee on E-Science and Data-Centric Science

Background and Missions

The recent significant advancement of information and communication technology has lead to establishment of a novel scientific / technological methodology called "e-science or "data-centric science", which can be seen as the 4th category of science, following empirical science, theoretical science, and computational science. The goal of this new type of methodology is to significantly accelerate academic research and its application to society by fully utilizing huge amount of real data and cyber information, which are generated and collected every moment. We believe that it is an essential methodological infrastructure to resolve social problems in the 21nd century.

This subcommittee discusses and recommends how the Science Council of Japan could promote establishment of data-centric science based on surveys on a wide range of related activities like sensoring, collection and organization of huge amount of data, data mining, modeling, prediction, simulation, high-speed networks, and information infrastructures consisting of computational resources (including electronic contents).

Scope

  • Future direction of e-science / data-centric science
  • Strategy for promotion of e-science / data-centic science
  • Roles and contribution to society

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Genshiro Kitagawa (Research Organization of Information and Systems)
E-mail: kitagawa [at] rois.ac.jp

Committee Members

Akiko Aizawa
National Institute of Informatics
Misako Aida
Hiroshima University
Noriko Arai
National Institute of Informatics
Keiko Imai
Chuo University
Kazuo Iwano
Mitsubishi Corporation
Naonori Ueda
NTT Communication Science Laboratories
Michiko Okura
Shibaura Institute of Technology
Naoki Kato
Kyoto University
Yasuyo Kita
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Chair
Genshiro Kitagawa
Research Organization of Information and Systems
Hiroaki Kobayashi
Tohoku University
Manager
Misako Takayasu
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Takeshi Tokuyama
Tohoku University
Hideyuki Nakashima
Future University Hakodate
Shojiro Nishio
Osaka University
Vice Chair
Tomoyuki Higuchi
Research Organization of Information and Systems, Institute of Statistical Methematics
Tomoko Matsui
Institute of Statistical Methematics
Michiko Matsuda
Kanagawa Institute of Technology
Yuji Matsumoto
Nara Institute of Science and Technology
Chizuko Yasunobu
Hitachi, Ltd.
Kenji Yamanishi
The University of Tokyo
Manager
Takashi Washio
Osaka University
Michiko Watanabe
Keio University

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Subcommittee on Information Science and Technology Education

Background and Missions

Information science and technology are penetrating every field in our society today. They serve as like a nerve system of the world, supporting global society and maintenance of public order. From the viewpoint of national strategy for fundamental education, it is of great importance to spread basic knowledge and ability related to information science and technology to every individual member of the society. To introduce a new technology (e.g., electronic government) to a social system of a democratic nation, it is particularly essential to improve people's literacy on information science and technology. Over a decade since Japanese government introduced "Informatics" as a subject for highschool curriculums in FY 2003, a variety of attempts have been made for this small number of academic degrees. Nonetheless, it has still not been introduced to the National Center Test for University Admissions. In addition to highschools, there is also a growing demand for introducing "Informatics" into curriculums for junior highschools. As well as expansion of "Informatics" as an individual subject, it is also important to prevail information education through seamless collaboration with other subjects to develop human resources for future society.

Information science and technology education for adults also needs to be promoted and established as part of scientific and technological literacy education like "Wisdom of Science and Technology." For example, it would be obvious that every people in the country should have appropriate information literacy against rapid spread of social media. In improving people's information literacy, it would be also important to rethink the role of experts on information science and technology.

Scope

  • Introduction of "Informatics" to the National Center Test for University Admissions
  • Introduction of "Informatics" to junior highshool curriculums
  • Collaboration of highschools and universities in information science and technology
  • Literacy education on information science and technology for adults
  • Education and qualifications for engineers in information science and technology

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Masami Hagiya (The University of Tokyo)
E-mail: hagiya [at] i.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Committee Members

Kenichiro Ishii
Nagoya University
Toru Ishida
Kyoto University
Mamoru Ito
Waseda University
Manager
Hideya Iwasaki
University of Electro-Communications
Makoto Iwata
Kochi University of Technology
Kazunori Ueda
Waseda University
Yuji Oie
Kyushu Institute of Technology
Atsushi Ohori
Tohoku University
Vice Chair
Katsuhiko Kakehi
Waseda University
Hideko Kunii
Shibaura Institute of Technology
Toshiki Sakabe
Nagoya University
Eijiro Sumii
Tohoku University
Rinichiro Taniguchi
Kyushu University
Takeshi Tokuyama
Tohoku University
Toru Nishigaki
Tokyo Keizai University, The University of Tokyo
Chair
Masami Hagiya
The University of Tokyo
Noyuri Mima
Future University Hakodate

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Subcommittee on Ubiquitous and Context-Aware Social Infrastructure

Background and Missions

Ubiquitous computing is a system of technology to allow any people to utilize information processing capability of computers anytime and anywhere. It is enabled by computing components universally embedded in the environment, aiming for providing context-aware well-optimized services. Such systems allow for significant improvement in people's lives and activity, ranging from logistics of goods and services to safety and security in individual regions, well-optimized public services, and prompt response against huge disasters.

Integration of cyber and physical spaces has been almost achieved in terms of technical development. Towards ultimate realization and applications of the ubiquitous computing technology with seamless integration over different organizations, however, there is still another missing component: an open and universal social information infrastructure, which serves as a hub of context information that integrates attributes and spatio-temporal information of objects (i.e., ubiquitous space information). This subcommittee discusses strategy to establish the ubiquitous spatial information social infrastructure, a hub of future ubiquitous society. We actively collaborate with a variety of related research fields and carefully consider social issues and academic demands after the serious disaster on 11th of March to make discussion and recommendation from a wide range of informatics perspectives beyond boundaries between academia, industry, and government.

Scope

  • Infrastructure to allow interoperability of different object identification and spatial / temporal reference schemes
  • Organization of legal systems to promote definition of locations and explicit assignment of their identifiers
  • Promotion for development and implementation of an information retrieval infrastructure that handles spatio-temporal information
  • Promoting international standardization as Japanese original innovative technology
  • Social systems to guarantee reliability and privacy of attribute information, assigned to objects and locations

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Hideyuki Tokuda (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Keio University)
E-mail: hxt [at] sfc.keio.ac.jp

Committee Members

Yutaka Kidawara
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology
Ryuji Kono
Yokohama National University
Ken Sakamura
The University of Tokyo
Chair
Hideyuki Tokuda
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Keio University
Norihiro Hagita
Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International
Takahiro Hara
Osaka University
Teruo Higashino
Osaka University
Michihiko Mino
Kyoto University
Rieko Yamamoto
Fujitsu Laboratories

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Subcommittee on IT Media Social Infrastructure and Media Archive

Background and Missions

Web technology is evolving to essential media in both daily lives and business scenes. Significant technological innovations for search engines have explosively expanded the application range of the web, and the recent emergence of social networking services like Twitter and Facebook has greatly increased its importance even in formation of social communities. In the Great East Japan Earthquake, the web also took an important role as communication media while cellular networks were out of order.

This background suggests that the web media should be seen as an "IT media social infrastructure" rather than just one of technological fields. We need to envision future directions of this large-scale social challenge and to establish appropriate legislation. Recent computer systems like HEMS (Home Energy Management System) allow objects to transmit information, which often has strong relation with personal information. This issue is inevitable in cyber physical systems, and thus is discussed in this subcommittee. In the 20th term, we published a report titled "Record", pointing out the importance of web archives. However, reforms in the copyright law are limited so far and validity of web archives is still ambiguous. In terms of utilizing our experience on the great earthquake on March 11 in 2011 for future disaster control, it would be desirable to precisely record the related information.

The missions of this subcommittee are discussion and recommendation on the earthquake media archive, aiming for handing down our experience on the Great East Japan Earthquake to future generations and for understanding and analyzing its all-embracing portrait to build strategy for disaster control.

Scope

  • Analysis of impact of IT media on society
  • Recommendation of strategy towards desirable social infrastructures
  • Discussion and recommendation about archives of records in the Great East Japan Earthquake and policy of their utilization

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Katsumi Tanaka (Kyoto University)
E-mail: ktanaka [at] i.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Committee Members

Kiyoharu Aizawa
The University of Tokyo
Mitsuru Ishizuka
Waseda University, The University of Tokyo
Hiroyuki Kitagawa
University of Tsukuba
Yutaka Kidawara
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology
Masaru Kitsuregawa
National Institute of Informatics, The University of Tokyo
Sadao Kurohashi
Kyoto University
Masao Sakauchi
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology
Chair
Katsumi Tanaka
Kyoto University
Yukari Tsuji
Nippon Telegraph and Telephone West Corporation
Miki Haseyama
Hokkaido University
Takahiro Hara
Osaka University
Teruo Higashino
Osaka University
Michitaka Hirose
The University of Tokyo
Takashi Matsuyama
Kyoto University
Noyuri Mima
Future University Hakodate

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Subcommittee on Ambient Intelligence

Background and Missions

This subcommittee discusses the design of social systems enabled by information technology and the methodology to construct intellectual functions required in this process. We contribute to people's daily lives and environment through the theory and the technology on cognition (e.g., the senses, brain measurement, learning), agent (e.g., knowledge, intention, planning, behavior), and interaction (e.g., conversation, sign language, gesture, embodiment).

More specifically, we make deep discussion on the neighboring concepts of ambient intelligence (e.g., cyber-physical, wisdom of crowds, design, service engineering, QOL) and then move our focus to the topics with social demands (e.g., home healthcare, welfare for handicapped and elderly people, disaster reduction / recovery, food, BOP, arts and culture, entertainment), exploring for utilization of ambient intelligence.

Our mission is to provide recommendation for promoting ambient intelligence research through these discussions.

Scope

  • Technology, theory, and application of ambient intelligence as a frontier of informatics
  • Individual application scenarios (e.g., ambient intelligence for prompt information delivery in case of disaster)

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Kaoru Arakawa (Meiji University)
E-mail: kara [at] meiji.ac.jp

Committee Members

Vice Chair
Kiyoharu Aizawa
The University of Tokyo
Chair
Kaoru Arakawa
Meiji University
Toru Ishida
Kyoto University
Mitsuru Ishizuka
Waseda University, The University of Tokyo
Noboru Onishi
Nagoya University
Manager
Sadao Kurohashi
Kyoto University
Yoichi Suzuki
Tohoku University
Hiromi Tanaka
Ritsumeikan University
Noriko Nagata
Kwansei Gakuin University
Norihiro Hagita
Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International
Manager
Miki Haseyama
Hokkaido University
Kazuo Hiraki
The University of Tokyo
Michitaka Hirose
The University of Tokyo
Michihiko Mino
Kyoto University
Naomi Miyake
The University of Tokyo
Chizuko Yasunobu
Hitachi, Ltd.

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Subcommittee on Safe and Secure Society with Information Technology

Background and Missions

Development of Information technology significantly contributes to improvement of efficiency and convenience of our social activity. Information technology is rapidly infiltrating into society and now our society --- from daily lives of individual persons to international activity involving the whole society --- strongly depends on information social infrastructures. This trend would even further accelerate in the future. In addition to efficiency and convenience, however, the infiltration of information technology into society is also accompanied with vulnerability for attacks and accidents. Intentional or unintentional misuse of information technology often threatens social safety and security: cyber attacks intending to cause disorder in information social infrastructures, cyber fraud to illegally obtain money and secret information, spread of computer viruses and bots, illegal use and leakage of personal information / data, and damage by system disorder and malfunction are typical examples of such threats. Some issues like balance between protection of personal data and utilization and evaluating reasonable cost for protection of important social information infrastructures are beyond the scope of technical discussion.

In the future society with increasing dependence on information technology, we need to promote research and development of security and dependability technology, seamlessly fusing both fields. Collaboration with social infrastructure technology (e.g., civil engineering, architecture, transportation, communication, and energy) and comprehensive discussion integrating related fields like jurisprudence, economics, and psychology are also of necessity. From such a wide range of viewpoints, this subcommittee extracts and analyzes issues to be discussed at the Science Council of Japan and exchanges opinions on the role of this field to make recommendation about policy, technical development, social systems, and education.

Scope

  • Analysis and recommendation on information science and technology necessary for safety and security of society
  • Analysis and recommendation on fusion of multiple academic fields to establish a new field for safe and secure information society
  • Extraction and recommendation of other issues regarding promotion of this field

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Etsuya Shibayama (The University of Tokyo)
E-mail: etsuya [at] ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Committee Members

Chair
Etsuya Shibayama
The University of Tokyo
Hiroto Yasuura
Kyushu University
Kiyoshi Agusa
Nanzan University
Michiko Inoue
Nara Institute of Science and Technology
Hideki Imai
The University of Tokyo
Makoto Iwata
Kochi University of Technology
Kazuo Iwano
Mitsubishi Corporation
Toru Kikuno
Osaka Gakuin University
Shigeki Goto
Waseda University
Hiroaki Kobayashi
Tohoku University
Vice Chair
Shuichi Sakai
The University of Tokyo
Kazue Sako
NEC Corporation
Manager
Hiroaki Takada
Nagoya University
Kazuo Takaragi
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Hidehiko Tanaka
Institute of Information Security
Tetsuo Tamai
Hosei University
Takashi Nanya
The University of Tokyo
Shuji Hashimoto
Waseda University
Toru Fujiwara
Osaka University
Tomoko Matsui
Institute of Statistical Methematics
Manager
Atsuko Miyaji
Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Akinori Yonezawa
Chiba Institute of Technology

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Subcommittee on Software Engineering

Background and Missions

Appropriate and prompt development of software and technology to enable effective and efficient utilization and maintenance are keys for advancement of information and communication industry. With expansion of practical use fields of information technology, individual techniques for software development are becoming non-explicit. On the other hand, they are widely infiltrating into any fields, fusing multiple research / industrial fields. Thus importance of these techniques is increasing as fundamental technology to support society. The mission of software engineering is research and development of technology for development, use, and maintenance of software.

Especially in recent years, increasing amount of software development data (e.g., open source software) are shared and utilized. It triggers changes not only in the methodology themselves for development, use, and maintenance, but also in the role of research on software engineering. Both industry and academia are required to adapt to these changes and to clarify the current problems and future directions at any layers from theory to applications and new schemes for industry-academia and academia-academia collaborations.

This subcommittee discusses from a wide range of perspectives integrating industry, government, and academia to recommend directions of research and practices on software engineering, which are applicable around the world.

Scope

Organization of technical challenges regarding development, use, and maintenance of software and recommendation of strategy toward solutions.

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Kenichi Matsumoto (Nara Institute of Science and Technology)
E-mail: matumoto [at] is.naist.jp

Committee Members

Masaru Kitsuregawa
National Institute of Informatics, The University of Tokyo
Kiyoshi Agusa
Nanzan University
Keijiro Araki
Kyushu University
Manager
Mari Inoki
Kogakuin University
Vice Chair
Atsushi Ohori
Tohoku University
Toru Kikuno
Osaka Gakuin University
Hideko Kunii
Shibaura Institute of Technology
Takashi Nanya
Canon Inc.
Shinichi Honiden
National Institute of Informatics
Chair
Kenichi Matsumoto
Nara Institute of Science and Technology
Manager
Rieko Yamamoto
Fujitsu Laboratories

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Subcommittee on Challenges Posed by IT

Background and Missions

Advancement of science and technology has brought us great benefits. However, it has also posed new challenges that have not been seen in the past. In 2015, the Committee on Informatics launched a new sub-committee to identify benefits and drawbacks of science and technology through conversation with citizens. The goal of the sub-committee is to contrast benefits and drawbacks of science and technology, cases to overcome the drawbacks, societal impact of science and technology, and impact of regulations on development of science, technology, society and economy, to suggest how they should be. Information technology (IT) is one of the domains, where the benefits and drawbacks of science and technology are causing serious problems. Since IT is rapidly evolving and is also widely used in daily lives of ordinary people, the drawbacks in this domain are causing serious societal problems. The mission of this sub-committee is to suggest how IT should be through discussion of its benefits and drawbacks.

Scope

  • Identification of the drawbacks of IT and discussion toward solutions
  • Discussion of societal impact and follow-up for introduction
  • Collection of feedback from citizens at public symposia

Term of Service

Permanent

Chair

Masaru Kitsuregawa (National Institute of Informatics, The University of Tokyo)
E-mail: kitsure [at] tkl.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Committee Members

Toshihisa Takagi
The University of Tokyo
Kaoru Arakawa
Meiji University
Chair
Masaru Kitsuregawa
National Institute of Informatics, The University of Tokyo
Etsuya Shibayama
The University of Tokyo
Miwako Doi
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Nara Institute of Science and Technology
Hideyuki Tokuda
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Keio University
Masami Hagiya
The University of Tokyo
Manager
Teruo Higashino
Osaka University
Vice Chair
Hiroto Yasuura
Kyushu University
Manager
Yutaka Kidawara
National Institute of Information and Communications Technology
Shinji Shimojo
Osaka University
Norihiro Hagita
Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International
Kenichi Matsumoto
Nara Institute of Science and Technology
Chizuko Yasunobu
Hitachi, Ltd.

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